16 Replies to “The Leather Element: Comparing Alcohol Dyes to Oil Dyes”

  1. What can one expect to happen in mixing oil and alcohol dyes? I threw some dark brown alcohol dye into some saddle tan oil dye to darken it (maybe 4:1) and It turned out really wacky, with clearly defined streaks of both colours. I actually lovely the effect, but I wondered if this is is typical, and they won’t ever blend.

    1. Adam,
      I have only mixed the two by accident and had about the same result. They both have an alcohol carrier, but, the dyestuff is different. Doing things you’re not supposed to do can create some of the best techniques and if the outcome looks good to you then that’s all that matters!
      -Chuck

    1. Hi Jennifer,
      If there are areas you don’t want to be dyed we would not recommend dip dyeing- your best bet would be using a paintbrush. Hope that helps!

  2. Hi, Chuck. Any idea why certain pro dye colors are only available in 4 oz. bottles, and not quarts? Is this Feiblings decision, or Weaver’s? Thanks for the videos, enjoy them all.

      1. It would be really helpful if it said “oil” anywhere on the page where the 4 oz bottles of pro-dye are being sold. If I’d not found this video I’d not have known you were selling oil-based dye at all in less than gallon bottles.

        1. Hi there,
          Thank you for your comment! We added a bullet point to hopefully help with this. Fiebing’s changed the name of this dye from Professional Oil Dye to Pro Dye because there was some confusion behind the base of the dye. It is a solvent-based dye (always has been) but the oil is on the colorant and dyestuff which is why is penetrates the leather better and gives you a more uniform color. Hope this helps!

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